The Curious Case of Ms. Orange (Ms. Orange Intrigues Book 1)


Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online The Curious Case of Ms. Orange (Ms. Orange Intrigues Book 1) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with The Curious Case of Ms. Orange (Ms. Orange Intrigues Book 1) book. Happy reading The Curious Case of Ms. Orange (Ms. Orange Intrigues Book 1) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF The Curious Case of Ms. Orange (Ms. Orange Intrigues Book 1) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF The Curious Case of Ms. Orange (Ms. Orange Intrigues Book 1) Pocket Guide.

The Mysterious House of Mrs. Hutson The Misadventures of Mrs. Hutson 26 Feb Read this and over 1 million books with Kindle Unlimited. Sweet Shop The Misadventures of Mrs. Hutson Book 3 17 Mar Borrow for free from your Kindle device. Hutson Book 2 26 Jun The Curious Case of Ms. Orange Intrigues Book 1 11 Apr Maximillien 7 Sep The Society 6 Sep Torn 5 Feb Kevlar Node 22 Aug Frankie The Frog 3 Jul Devil's Banquet 2 Jun Monasteria 19 May The Monster of St.

Mark's 26 Feb Titanic's Sons 1 Apr The Hammer and Sickle 4 Dec Similarly, defining a good or bad day on the basis of how many red or yellow cars is no more illogical than an office-bound person's mood being dictated by the weather. All of this means animals are a better bet than humans: You always know what a dog is thinking - it has four moods.

Happy, sad, cross and concentrating. Also, dogs are faithful and they do not tell lies because they cannot talk". People are more of a mystery: For him "it's like being in a room with a one-way mirror in a spy film". Love is even more unfathomable: Comparisons I reread this during a rather stressful journey, including the passages when Christopher is making a stressful journey. It helped me empathise with him - to the extent that it exacerbated my own stress! View all 50 comments. Nov 21, Joe rated it did not like it.

The concept is interesting: The chapters are cleverly numbered by prime numbers, which ties in with the novel. It has interesting illustrations and diagrams to look at. However, I would not recommend this because it disappointed me and I couldn't, in good conscience, tell anyone to read a book I was disappointed in. I guess my disappointment lies in the fact that not only did my book club tout this as a mystery novel but also many of the li The concept is interesting: I guess my disappointment lies in the fact that not only did my book club tout this as a mystery novel but also many of the literary reviews I read as well.

What I was expecting was an exciting roller coaster ride mystery about an autistic boy trying to find the killer of his neighbor's dog and, as he slowly sleuths out the killer, finds himself embroiled in dangerous life threatening situations. However, The Curious Incident Instead, you get a novel that starts off as a promising murder mystery. At the first half of the novel, the mystery is solved. Or rather we're unceremoniously told who is the murderer of the dog. From that point, the second half of the novel hugely focuses on Christopher attempting to travel to London by himself.

A difficult task considering Christopher is autistic, hates crowds and can't stand to be touched by people. I won't tell who the murderer is or why Christopher takes off to London, as these are the only two real surprises of the novel. I will say overall this was a huge disappointment to me.

I thought I was getting an exciting murder mystery and instead I got a highly readable family melodrama. Perhaps if this was not pushed as a murder mystery I would have enjoyed it much more. An interesting read but I wouldn't recommend it. View all 25 comments. View all 3 comments. Jan 05, jo rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Jun 10, Amanda rated it really liked it Recommended to Amanda by: Chicks on Lit book club pick for August Am I Christopher Boone?

What is it about my OCD self-diagnosed, boo yah! Fate is kind, but there is nothing more disturbing than learning that you possess so many of those qualities that categorize people as "special needs. Choosing Item A over Item B because you like the color? Getting lost in London Underground? Getting ridiculously sidetracked durin Am I autistic? Getting ridiculously sidetracked during storytelling? I've got it all. And it wasn't so bothersome at first, but as I read on, I grew to empathize with this kid so much so, that I felt like a fucking crazy person.

I'm glad I'm done reading it. Some items of note: I remember when I used to like maths. Christopher has a pet rat.

The Mysterious House of Mrs. Hutson (The Misadventures of Mrs. Hutson)

I remember when I used to have a pet rat. Pet rats are fun! I wish Siobhan was my girlfriend. I mean, I don't think I'd be satisfied sexually, but still. She seems like a great gal. I have decided that it is impossible for non-crazy people to ever reach peace and comforting solitude. That's why snatching it bit by bit is necessary. I don't want to give birth.

Haddon, for the quick read. Life is quite complicated, even outside London, huh?

  1. Eddie Edwards.
  2. Secrets of the Heart.
  3. The Voiceover Bible.
  4. 404 NOT FOUND.

View all 53 comments. Apr 20, Jen Terpstra rated it did not like it Recommends it for: People who annoy me. Ok, I get the concept. A heartwarming story told from the vantage point of an autistic boy. For the "Literary Snob"? I should have known. I'm smart, I'm educated. I'm a professional woman who adores literature and loves to read. I'd also read the reviews. I'll give it a shot, ok? It took me a full month to get through this book. This from someone who can devour a book in twelve hours including "masterpieces" such as Memoirs of a Geisha, Jane Eyre and Pride and Prejudice I didn't like it.

It left me depressed and out of sorts. And a little pissed off. If that's what makes a "Classic" these days, please count me out. I'll stick with my "silly" genre novels ANY day of the week. View all 30 comments. May 21, Shawn Sorensen rated it it was amazing Shelves: Kapitoil was close, but The Curious Incident paints a more complete picture. Like many teenage boys, he dreams of long periods of alone time. So he has your attention right away. Except that no one wants to tell him anything about the dog except the kindly, lonely old Mrs. Alexander, who finally breaks it to the boy that his mom was cheating on his dad.

Then a lot more rains down. It just sort of ends. There is no one in the story who treats Christopher the way he wants to be treated except a counselor at school.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

This is a good story in which we learn a lot about this condition. I raced through everything regardless. His thinking is that in a couple of centuries the human race might evolve to where the human beings of today end up on display in a zoo. And if we all kill each other through war or wearing out the planet, then insects could end up being the most superior creatures on earth. He has interesting theories on the constellations, the Big Bang theory, major religions, etc.

View all 21 comments. The curious Incident of the dog in the Night-Time, Mark Haddon The novel is narrated in the first-person perspective by Christopher John Francis Boone, a year-old boy who describes himself as "a mathematician with some behavioural difficulties" living in Swindon, Wiltshire. Although Christopher's condition is not stated, the book's blurb refers to Asperger syndrome, high-functioning autism, or savant syndrome.

In July , Haddon wrote on his blog that "Curious Incident is not a book abou The book is not specifically about any specific disorder," and that he, Haddon, is not an expert on autism spectrum disorder or Asperger syndrome. Jan 11, Duane rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is the story of Christopher Boone, a very likable 15 year old who suffers from Asperger Syndrome, a type of higher functioning Autism. Christopher sets out to solve a mystery; who killed Wellington, his neighbors dog, something he wants very much to do because he is accused of committing the crime. View all 12 comments.

Jun 21, Will M. You can't please everyone, and I guess books can be a good example of that statement. I know a lot of people who liked this book very much, but on the other hand, I also know a few people who would not hesitate to burn this book. I'm on the positive side. I really enjoyed this short novel. I've said this numerous times in my other reviews that I like character driven novels. This book obviously focused on Christopher's development more than the plot's.

The author succeeded, because I've gotten at You can't please everyone, and I guess books can be a good example of that statement. The author succeeded, because I've gotten attached to the little kiddo. I have a soft spot for people, more on children, with disabilities. I can't stomach to be annoyed at them because it's not something they can control. While I don't know anyone personally with autism, the author managed to give justice to the sickness. It's not the best book on autism, but it's a short preview of it.

I honestly don't like reading huge novels during the school year. I'd rather read those gigantic books during my breaks because I tend to enjoy them better when read at my own pace. Reading is not a task for me, but it's something that I consider to be leisure. Stress from the university is not something I could control, so reading shorter novels help me unwind at times. It's actually my exam week next week but I managed to squeeze this book in my hectic schedule. I didn't feel like rushing because it was so short to begin with. Aside from being short, it was also really entertaining.

Like I said, it's not a novel that everyone's going to love, but I'd recommend taking the risk and find out for yourself. Sometimes the opinion of others may seem right, but in the end it's all about what the novel made you feel after reading.

The Curious Case of Ms. Orange (Ms. Orange Intrigues Book 1) - Kindle edition by Eddie Edwards. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC. The Curious Case of Ms. Orange (Ms. Orange Intrigues) [Eddie Edwards] on uzotoqadoh.tk *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Youtube and Google rave, Ms.

You don't have to go with the flow and hate on something you actually like. The author created a negative stereotype of Asperger's and autism and offended the Asperger's community. He's not an expert, has no experience with these disorders and did no research Mark Haddon's blog. I think this is really important to know when you read the book. I'm not enthusiastic about this book. I kept asking myself this question: I had my doubts. No doubt the thought-processes of Christopher were sometimes accurate, but I think it was overdone most of the time.

What also bothered me was the improbability that an autistic kid, who was only allowed to go to the shop at the end of the road on his own, and who has rage and panic seizures regularly, would have a Swiss Army Knife in his pocket all the time. A long time ago, I read a memoir written by a girl who has autism, and I really loved it.

Books by Eddie Edwards

It was not a light read, and it left me emotionally drained, as if her life-story was about my own child. In comparison with that book, The Curious Incident was rather a light read that didn't get me emotionally involved. I would recommend this other book to everyone but the problem is I don't remember it's title or it's author. I've done a search and maybe it was this book, but I'm not sure: The Extraordinary Autobiography of an Autistic While reading the reviews for that book, I stumbled on this review: It is a story of a brilliant woman trapped inside the odd shell autism creates, suffering inside it alone and at the hands of her mother and then beating her way out of it and learning, through trial and error, how to be herself.

I don't have it -- I must have given it away -- or I would consult it to be more specific. But I have always kept it in mind as my son and I grow together, trying to figure out which extraordinary parts of him he needs relief from, and which are essential to who he is. All parents of children with autism want to hear the true voice of their kids who are locked inside their autism, and hearing Donna Williams' voice confirms that there are unimaginable riches of character and intelligence and sensitivity, even in the most apparently disconnected.

Well this review assured me that it's okay to write a negative review for this book, although I didn't hate the book, it only left me feeling cold. View all 52 comments.

What a beautiful story! The main character, Christopher, is delightful. I highly recommend this book to everyone! View all 22 comments. Nov 14, Helene Jeppesen rated it really liked it. This was a truly amazing story told from the point of view of Christopher, an autist boy. Right from the beginning, you are being thrown into this mystery story - which is not really a mystery story but a story about Christopher's life and struggles.

This book comes with surprises and I loved that. I think I should've seen them coming but I didn't. So if you've read and liked that book, there's a chance you will l This was a truly amazing story told from the point of view of Christopher, an autist boy. So if you've read and liked that book, there's a chance you will like "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime" as well: View all 5 comments.

Feb 23, David Schaafsma rated it it was amazing Shelves: Re-read for my Fall YAL class. One of the best YA books ever, wonderful and surprising on so many levels. As a parent of a kid with autism and another kid who is spectrum-y, it hits home for me in ways it might not for others.

For ms snowyplayzgamez plus:3

As with many mysteries, it features some misdirection; it appears to be about a kid with Asperger's Syndrome investigating a mystery about a dead dog in the manner of his hero and also Aspergerish Sherlock Holmes, but becomes an even richer and ever wide Re-read for my Fall YAL class. As with many mysteries, it features some misdirection; it appears to be about a kid with Asperger's Syndrome investigating a mystery about a dead dog in the manner of his hero and also Aspergerish Sherlock Holmes, but becomes an even richer and ever widening investigation of human tragedy and mystery and the complex nature of love and grief.

I find it very moving, having read it several times. My feeling this time?

See a Problem?

That almost half of the book is about the London trip when Christopher goes to see his estranged mother, and maybe that's a little too long; it makes the story into a kind of movie thriller of sorts, when the heart of the book for me is about mysteries, a dog murdered and just what that means for Christopher and his family, relationships, love, the grief and despair of dealing with a kid with special needs, that heartbreak, all stuff I have been through.

I was divorced in the process of trying to deal with the anguish and despair and grief of discovering my son had autism, at the same time trying to do everything we could to try to reverse the process. So I could empathize with the parents. One thing that is different in recent readings is that I have watched and rewatched the BBC Sherlock and the American Elementary and I have this as background for a very Sherlock-focused book it's Christopher's favorite set of stories. I also have been reading Agatha Christie Poirot mysteries, so I have that related background.

I had forgotten Christopher talks of faith and ghosts in this book with respect to logic and Reason. There's a consideration of metaphor and story for the purpose of making meaning, since this first person story is told by Christopher for a school project, a story of ever widening mysteries of life. I admit to tears in several places, earned tears from Haddon. May 21, C. Christopher Boone is a mathematical and scientific genius. What I loved about this book was: Kind of obvious, I guess, but bear with me. Yes, that was a word sentence. I read it in a few hours flat.

As the story unraveled, I felt sad and happy and worried and sad yes, unfeeling reviewer that I am, I DO have feelings. And the book ends in tears and — but no spoilers. Depending on his feelings, the sentences range in length, the narrative becomes clear or lumpy, and the chapters change degrees of intensity. Every couple of chapter, the topic seems to run off — on some spree of mathematical genius. Yes, I confess to being lost on those chapters. But it added to the story!

And anyone who gets me saying math is amazing and deserves an award. I also like the fact it was set in England. The book breaks writing rules. This book excuse me for not writing out the title again breaks a LOT of rules. Most of it is plain narrative. The writing gets passive because of that. It touched my bookish soul. Now I know who killed the dog. Do you want to know? Jul 07, Trevor rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Another member on Goodreads told me to read this book - I meant to, but didn't until she got annoyed with me for taking so long and sent me a copy.

It is a remarkable book - the only thing I can think that is similar to it is perhaps that short story, Flowers for Algernon. My older sister is intellectually disabled, I grew up a science nerd and my daughter is a Sherlock Holmes nut. While I was reading it the central character seemed a strange fusion of the three of us. This book has so many reso Another member on Goodreads told me to read this book - I meant to, but didn't until she got annoyed with me for taking so long and sent me a copy. This book has so many resonances for me that when I get old and dotty I may even think that I wrote it.

If you haven't read this book and have been put off because you think it's a children's book or it sounds a bit silly - don't put it off any longer. It is a beautifully written story that is moving without playing any cheap games with you as a reader. Look, it is a delight. View all 9 comments. My older son is autistic spectrum, so this was a must-read.

But even if you don't know any autistic people, it's a great novel. The central character is engaging and totally credible. Funny how it's suddenly become cool to be autistic What does that say about our society? Have we been too respectful of people whose main ability is to manipulate the emotions of others, and are we now thinking better of it? View all 6 comments. This one of the editorial acquisitions I'm most proud of I've bought rights for this novel while it was still in manuscript, before first publication and much before all the awards it received later Also, I had the pleasure of meeting Mark Haddon twice His a great author and very nice person and has good memory: Unfortunately, he didn't sell well in Serbia I changed him a publisher but with no better results Due to bad sales he won't be translated into Serbian, most probably: The narrator is a teenage boy with special needs and there is something so refreshing about his narrative which isn't bogged down by feelings and repetitive internal monologues.

Are You an Author?

The author succeeded, because I've gotten attached to the little kiddo. Their emotional reactions may be intense but these attenuate rapidly, leaving little damaging residue. Want to Read saving…. If you haven't read this book and have been put off because you think it's a children's book or it sounds a bit silly - don't put it off any longer. My work covers a wide spectrum of subject matter including education, true story, action, romance, mystery, espionage, thriller, horror, science fiction, family saga, supernatural, historical fiction and gothic. I didn't like it.

It is not mentioned what type of developmental disorder Christopher, our narrator, has but his behavior is indicative of either Autism or Asperger's. Regardless of what he has, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time gives us a first person perspective of the day-to-day life of someone with developmental disorders.