Put in his thumb and pulled out a plum : stories for a Christmas pie (1886)


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With rny wing wang waddle oh, Jack sing saddle oh, Blowsey boys buble oh, Under the broom. I sold my cow, and I bought me a calf; I'd fain have made a fortune, but lost the best half: I sold my calf, and I bought me a cat ; A pretty thing she was, in my chimney corner sat: I sold my cat, and bought me a mouse ; He carried fire in his tail, and burnt down my house: Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep, And dreamt she heard them bleating ; But when she awoke, she found it a joke, For they still were all fleeting.

Then up she took her little crook, Determin'd for to find them ; She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed, For they'd left all their tails behind 'em, CXLIV. Jeanie come tie my, Jeanie come tie my, Jeanie come tie my bonnie cravat; I've tied it behind, I've tied it before, And I've tied it so often, I'll tie it no more.

TRIP upon trenchers, and dance upon dishes. My mother sent me for some barm, some barm ; She bid me tread lightly, and come again quickly, For fear the young men should do me some harm. Yet didn't you see, yet didn't you see, What naughty tricks they put upon me: Itim- bault tells me this is coiuiuoii iu Yorkshire. Besides we that travel, With pumps full of gravel,.

Made all of such running leather: That once in a week, New masters we seek, And never can hold together. And why may not I love Johnny? And why may not Johnny love me? And why may not I love Johnny As well as another body? And here's a leg for a stocking, And here is a leg for a shoe, And he has a kiss for his daddy, And two for his mammy, I trow. And why may not I love Johnny, As well as another body.

As I was walking o'er little Moorfields, I saw St. Paul's a running on wheels, With a fee, fo, fum. Then for further frolics I'll go to France. While; Jack shall sing and his wife shall With a fee, fo fum. And do you ken Elsie Marley, honey? The wife who sells the barley, honey ; She won't get up to serve her swine, And do you ken Elsie Marlev, honev? The tirst lour lines have Income favourites in the nursery. How shall we build it up again? Dance o'er my lady lee ; How shall we build it up again? With a gay lady. Silver and gold will be stole away, Dance o'er my lady lee ; Silver and gold will be stole away, With a gay lady.

Build it up again with iron and steel, Dance o'er my lady lee ; Build it up with iron and steel, With a gay lady. Iron and steel will bend and bow, Dance o'er my lady lee! Iron and steel will bend and bow, With a gay lady. Build it up with stone so strong, Dance o'er my lady lee ; Huzza! It occurs in Chaucer, Leg. Now Tom with his pipe made such a noise, That he pleas'd both the girls and boys, And they stopp'd to hear him play, " Over the hills and far away.

As Dolly was milking her cow one day, Tom took out his pipe and began for to play: So Doll and the cow danced " the Cheshire round," Till the pail was broke, and the milk ran on the ground. He met old dame Trot with a basket of He used his pipe, and she used her legs ; She danced about till the eggs were all broke, She began for to fret, but he laughed at the joke. Nay ; I'll not give my fiddle To any man alive. The following- lines are part of an old sone. I LOVE sixpence, pretty little sixpence, I love sixpence better than my life ; I spent a penny of it, I spent another, And took fourpence home to my wife.

Oh, my little fourpence, pretty little four- pence, I love fourpence better than my life ; I spent a penny of it, I spent another, And I took twopence home to my wife. Oh, my little nothing, my pretty little no- thing, What will nothing buy for my wife? I have nothing, I spend nothing, I love nothing better than iny wife. MERRY are the bells, and merry would they ring, Merry was myself, and merry could I sing ; AVith a merry ding-dong, happy, gay, and free, And a merry sing-song, happy let us be!

Waddle goes your gait, and hollow are your hose, Noddle goes your pate, and purple is your nose ; Merry is your sing-song, happy, gay, and free, With a merry ding-dong, happy let us be! Merry have we met, and merry have we been, Merry let us part, and merry meet again ; With our merry sing-song, happy, gay, and free, And a merry ding-dong, happy let us be! One a penny, two a penny Hot-cross Buns!

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If ye have no daughters, Give them to your sons. Wooley Foster has a cow, Black and white about the mow, Open the gates and let her through, Woolev Foster's ain cow! In his ear, in his nose, Thus, do you see? He ate the dormouse, Else it was he. As I was going up the hill, I met with Jack the piper, And all the tunes that he could play Was " Tie up your petticoats tighter.

THERE were two birds sat on a stone, Fa, la, la, la, lal, de ; One flew away, and then there was one, Fa, la, la, la, lal, de ; The other flew after, and then there was none. Fa, la, la, la, lal, de ; And so the poor stone was left all alone, Fa, la, la, la, lal, de! How does my lady's garden grow? With cockle shells, and silver bells, And pretty maids all of a row. He worked and sung from morn till night, No lark so blithe as he, And this the burden of his song For ever used to be I jump mejerrime jee!

I care for nobody no! As I was going along, long, long, A singing a comical song, song, song, The lane that I went was so long, long, long, And the song that I sung was as long, long, long, And so I went singing along. WHERE are you going, rny pretty maid? I'm going a-milking, sir, she said. May I go with you, my pretty maid? You're kindly welcome, sir, she said. What is your father, my pretty maid? My father's a farmer, sir, she said. Say, will you marry me, my pretty maid? Yes, if you please, kind sir, she said. Will you be constant, my pretty maid? That I can't promise you, sir, she said.

Then I won't marry you, my pretty maid! Nobody asked you, sir! Peters ; When will the ball come, Say the bells of St. MY father left me three acres of land, Sing ivy, sing ivy ; My father left me three acres of land, Sing holly, go whistle arid ivy! I ploughed it with a ram's horn, Sing ivy, sing ivy ; And sowed it all over with one pepper corn, Sing holly, go whistle and ivy!

I harrowed it with a bramble bush, Sing ivy, sing ivy ; And reaped it with my little penknife, Sing holly, go whistle and ivy! The miller he swore he would have her paw, And the cat she swore she would scratch his face, Sing holly, go whistle and ivy! They all ran after the farmer's wife, Who cut off their tails with the carving-knife, Did you ever see such fools in your life?

See also the ' Pills to Purge Melancholy,' , vol. See Dauriey's ' Ancient Scottish Melodies,' , p. The story is of old date, and in there was licensed ' A most strange weddinge of the frogge and the mouse,' as appears from the books of the Stationers 1 ' Company, quoted in Wartoii's HIM. And when her uncle Rat came home, Who's been here since I've been gone?

This duck she swallow'd him up with a pluck, Kitty alone, Kitty alone ; This cluck she swallow'd him up with a pluck, So there's an end of my history book. Cock me cary, Kitty alone, Kittv alone and I. THERE was a man in our toone, in our toone, in oar toone, There was a man in our toone, and his name was Billy Pod ; And he played upon an old razor, an old razor, an old razor, And he played upon an old razor, with my fiddle fiddle fe fum fo.

And there was a man in titlier toone, in tither toone, in titlier toone, And there was a man in titlier toone, and his name was Edrin Drum ; And he played upon an old laaelle, an old laadle, an old laadle, And he played upon an old laadle, with my fiddle fiddle fe fmn fo. Her back stood up, and her bones they were bare ; he, haw, hum! John Cook was riding up Shuter's bank ; he, haw, hum! And there his nag did kick and prank ; he, haw, hum! His mare fell down, and she made her will ; he, haw, hum! The bridle and saddle were laid on the shelf; he, haw, hum!

If you want any more you may sing it your- self ; he, haw, hum! Wife, bring me my old bent bow, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do, That I may shoot yon carrion crow ; Sing heigh ho, the carrion crow, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do. The tailor he shot and missed his mark, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do ; And shot his own sow quite through the heart ; Sing heigh ho, the carrion crow, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do.

Wife, bring brandy in a spoon ; Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do, For our old sow is in a swoon, Sing heigh ho, the carrion crow, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do. I have quite missed my mark, And shot the poor sow to the heart ; Wife, bring treacle in a spoon, Or else the poor sow's heart will down. Take a little, and leave a little, And do not come again ; For if you do, I will shoot you through, And there is an end of you. IF I'd as much money as I could spend, I never would cry old chairs to mend ; Old chairs to mend, old chairs to mend ; I never would cry old chairs to mend.

If I'd as much money as I could tell, I never would cry old clothes to sell ; Old clothes to sell, old clothes to sell ; I never would cry old clothes to sell. Whistle, daughter, whistle, whistle for rvnimrl a pound ; I cannot whistle, mammy, I cannot make a sound. Dame, what makes your maidens lie, Maidens lie, maidens lie ; Dame, what makes your maidens lie, On Christmas-day in the morning? Dame, what makes your ducks to die, Ducks to die, ducks to die ; Dame, what makes your ducks to die.

On Christmas-day in the morning? Their wings are cut and they cannot fly, Cannot fly, cannot fly ; Their wings are cut and they cannot fly, On Christmas-day in the morning. I went into my next door neighbour's, There I bought a pipkin and a popkin A slipkin and a slopkin, A nailboard, a sailboard, And all for a farthing.

TEN and ten and twice eleven, Take out six and put in seven ; Go to the green and fetch eighteen, And drop one a coming. A walnut, i As soft as silk, as white as milk, As hitter as gall, a thick wall. And a green coat covers me all. I've been a hunting With my dog and my doe. Lined with a skin as soft as silk ; Within a fountain crystal clear, A golden apple doth appear.

No doors there are to this strong-hold. Yet things break in and steal the gold. Fire and water, earth and air ; Ev'ry customer has two pair. My first is snapping, snarling, growling, My second's industrious, romping, and prowling. Higgledy piggledy Here we lie, Pick'd and pluck'd, And put in a pie.

THERE were three sisters in a hall, There came a knight amongst them all ; Good morrow, aunt, to the one, Good morrow, aunt, to the other, Good morrow, gentlewoman, to the third, If you were my aunt, As the other two be, I would say good morrow, Then, aunts, all three. We tire the horse, but comfort man Tell me this riddle if you can. The answer is, a rainbow.

Tell me this riddle while I count eight. Spell me that without a P, And a clever scholar you will be. As I was going o'er Westminster bridge, I met with a Westminster scholar ; He pulled off his cap an drew off his glove, And wished me a very good morrow. What is his name? Up jumps two legs, Catches up three legs, Throws it after four legs, And makes him bring back one leg.

A stick in his hand, a stone in his throat, If you'll tell me this riddle, I'll give you a groat. They found a bird's nest with five eggs in, They all took one, and left four in.

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As I was going to St. Ives, I met a man with seven wives, Every wife had seven sacks, Every sack had seven cats, Every cat had seven kits: Kits, cats, sacks, and wives, How many were there going to St. Who said it had horns, but was not a beast! A horse's head where his tail should be.

I HAD a little castle upon the sea-side, One half was water, the other was land ; I open'd my little castle door, and guess what I found ; I found a fair lady with a cup in her hand. The cup was gold, filled with wine ; Drink, fair lady, and thou shalt be mine! And I will give thee a gown of silk: A gown of silk and a silver tee, If thou wilt let down thy milk to me. See a paper in the ' Archseologia,' vol. Ill, and Ady'3 Candle in the Dark," 4to, London, , p. Four corners to my bed, Four angels round my head ; One to watch, one to pray, And two to bear my soul away!

It was to be said thrice. Peter stands at the gate, Waiting for a butter'd cake ; Come, butter, come! Untwirling the twine that untwisteth be- tween, He twirls, with the twister, the two in a twine: Then tw r ice having twisted the twines of the twine He twisteth the twine he had twined in twain. The twain that, in twining, before in the twine, As twines were intwisted ; he now doth un- twine: If a thatcher of Thatchwood went to Thatchet a thatching, Where's the thatching the thatcher of Thatchwood has thatch'd?

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MY grandmother sent me a new-fashioned three cornered cambric country cut hand- kerchief. Not an old-fashioned three cor- nered cambric country cut handkerchief, but a new-fashioned three cornered cambric country cut handkerchief. Come again another day ; Hickup, hickup, when I bake, I'll give to you a butter-cake. Three drops in the cup Arc good for the hiccup. There came by a pedlar whose name was Stout, He cnt her petticoats all round about ; He cut her petticoats up to the knees, Which made the old woman to shiver and freeze.

When this little woman first did Avake, She began to shiver and she began to shake, She began to wonder and she began to cry, " Oh! THERE was an old woman who lived in a shoe, She had so many children she didn't know what to do ; She gave them some broth without any bread, She whipped them all well and put them to bed. OLD woman, old woman, shall we go a shearing? Speak a little louder, sir, I am very thick of hearing.

Old woman, old woman, shall I love you dearly? Thank you, kind sir, I hear you very clearly. The neighbours all pitch'd her into the water, Her leg was drown'd first, and her head fol- low'd a'ter. Hot pies and cold pies to sell! Wherever she goes, You may follow her by the smell. THERE was an old woman toss'd up in a basket Nineteen times as high as the moon ; Where she was going I couldn't but ask it, For in her hand she carried a broom.

Old woman, old woman, old woman, quoth I, O whither, O whither, O whither, so high? To brush the cobwebs off the sky! Shall I go with thee?

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My true love lives far from me I went to the wood and kill'd a tory ; I went to the wood and kill'd another; Was it the same, or was it his brother? Number number nine, this hoop's mine TRIP upon trenchers, and dance upon dishes. One-ery, two-ery, hickary, hum

Aye, by and by. She went to the baker's To buy him some bread, But when she came back The poor dog was dead. She went to the joiner's To buy him a coffin, But when she came back The poor dog was laughing. So in Sliuksjiraro's Mills. Night's Dream,' a'et ii, sc. She took a clean dish To get him some tripe, But when she came back He was smoking his pipe.

She went to the ale-honse To get him some beer, But when she came back The dog sat in a chair. She went to the tavern For white wine and red, But when she came back The dog stood on his head. She went to the hatter's To buy him a hat, But when she came back He was feeding the cat. She went to the barber's To bay him a wig, But when she came back lie was dancing a jig. She went to the fruiterer's To buy him some fruit, But when she came back He was playing the ilute.

She went to the tailor's To buy him a coat, But when she came back He was riding a goat. She went to the cobbler's To buy him some shoes, But when she came back He was reading the news. She went to the sempstress To buy him some linen, But when she came back The dog was spinning. She went to the hosier's To buy him some hose, But when she came back He w r as dress'd in his clothes. The dame made a curtsey, The dog made a bow ; The dame said, your servant, The dog said, bow, wow.

Jerry was hung, James was drowned, John was lost and never was found, And there was an end of the three sons, Jerry, and James, and John! With all my heart, the old woman said, If that you will allow, To-morrow you'll stay at home in my stead, And I'll go drive the plough -. But you must milk the Tidy cow, For fear that she go dry ; And you must feed the little pigs That are within the sty ; And you must mind the speckled hen, For fear she lay away ; And you must reel the spool of yarn That I spun yesterday.

The old man took a pail in his hand, And went to milk the cow ; But Tidy hinched, and Tidy flinched, And Tidy broke his nose, And Tidy gave him such a blow, That the blood ran down to his toes. He went to feed the little pigs, That were within the sty ; He hit his head against the beam, And he made the blood to fly. He went to mind the speckled hen. For fear she'd lay astray, And he forgot the spool of yarn His wife spun yesterday.

So he swore by the sun, the moon, and the stars, And the green leaves on the tree, If his wife didn't do a day's work in her life, She should ne'er be ruled by he. On, dear, what can the matter be? Two old women got up in an apple tree ; One came down, And the other staid till Saturday. I'm obliged to hammer and smite From four in the morning till eight at night, For a bad master, and a worse dame.

A man stretched his mouth to its utmost extent, And down at one gulp house and old woman went. He took away my bread and cheese, And that is how he served me. Stick, stock, stone dead, Blind man can't see, Every knave will have a slave, You or I must be he. In a children's game, where all the little actors ars seated ir a circle, the following stanza is used as question and answer. None but cruel Tom! Who steals all the sheep at night? None but this poor one. Dance, ye merry men, every one: For Thumbkin, he can dance alone, [The thumb only moving. Thumbkin, he can dance alone, [Ditto.

Dance, Foreman, dance, [The first finger moving. Littleman cannot dance alone. Hull's eyes and targets, Say the bells of St. Brickbats and tiles, Say the bells of St. Oranges and lemons, Say the bells of St. Pancakes and fritters, Say the bells of St. Two sticks and an apple, Say the bells at Whitechapel.

Old Father Baldpate, Say the slow bells at Aldgate. You owe me ten shillings, Say the bells at St.

Little Jack Horner

Pokers and tongs, Say the bells at St. Kettles and pans, Say the bells at St. When will you pay me? Say the bells at Old Bailey. When I grow rich, Say the bells at Shoreditch. Pray when will that be? Say the bells of Stepney. I am sure I don't know, Says the great bell at Bow. Here comes a candle to light you to bed, And here conies a chopper to chop off your head. J Some like it hot, Some like it cold, Some like it in the pot, Nine days old. You and you points but specially you, [Or sometimes, but specially Sue.

During the Mother's absence, the Gipsy comes in, entices a child away, and hides her.

Little Jack Horner - Nursery Rhymes

This process ia repeated till all the children are hidden, when the Mother lias to find them. Take, this What's this? Eleven ships sailing o'er the main, Some bound for France and some for Spain: I wish them all safe home again: Ten comets in the sky, Some low and some high ; Nine peacocks in the air, I wonder how they all came there, I do not know and I do not care ; Eight joiners in joiner's.

Seven lobsters in a dish, As fresh as any heart could wish Six beetles against the Avail, Close by an old woman' s apple stal! With a gaping, wide-mouthed, waddling frog. One rush, two rush, Pray thee, fine lady, come under my bush. PA passes bv under the arch, followed by the whole string of children, the last of whom is taken captive by B and c. The following; seems to belong to the last game; hut it ia aauaUy found by itself in the small books of children's rhymes.

I send you three letters, and pray read one, You must read one, if you can't read all, So pray, Miss or Master, throw up the ball. All the day they hunted, And nothing could they h'nd But a ship a-sailing, A-sailing with the wind. One said it was a ship, The other he said, nay ; The third said it was a house, With the chimney blown away And all the night they hunted, And nothing could they find But the moon a-gliding, A-gliding with the wind.

One said it was the moon, The other he said, nay ; The third said it was a cheese, And half o't cut away. And all the day they hunted, And nothing could they find But a hedgehog in a bramble bush, And that they left behind. The first said it was a hedgenog, The second he said, nay: The third it was a pincushion, And the pins stuck in wrong way. And all the night they hunted, And nothing could they find But a hare in a turnip field, And that they left behind. And all the day they hunted, And nothing could they find But an owl in a holly tree, And that they left behind.

One said it was an owl, The other he said, nay ; The third said 'twas an old mail, And his beard growing grey. Is John Smith within? Yes, that he is. Can he set a shoe? Ay, marry, two, Here a nail, there a nail, Tick, tack, too. I AM a gold lock, 2. I am a gold key, 1. I am a silver lock. I am a silver key.

I am a brass lock. I am a brass key. I am a lead lock. I am a lead key. I am a monk lock. I am a monk key! And a twopenny appie-pie. And Jack jump over The candle-stick. Wnoor, whoop, and hollow, Good dogs won't follow, Without, the hare cries "pee wit. TIP, top, tower, Tumble down in an hour. I WENT up one pair of stairs. I went up two pair of stairs. I went into a room. I looked out of a window. And there I saw a monkey. Here goes my young miss, An amble, an amble, an amble, an amble! The footman lays behind to tipple ale and wine, And goes gallop, a gallop, a gallop, to make up his time.

Two girls are said to be " cheese and cheese. To market ride the gentlemen, So do we, so do we ; Then comes the country clown, Hobbledy gee, Hobbledy gee; First go the ladies, mm, mm, nim: Next come the gentlemen, trim, trim, trim ; Then comes the country clowns, gallop-a- trot.

RIDE a cock-horse to Banbury-cross, To see an old lady upon a white horse, Rings on her fingers, and bells on her toes, And so she rnakes music wherever she goes. LET us go to the wood, says this pig ; 2. What to do there? To look for my mother, says this pig ; 4. What to do with her? Kiss her to death, says this pig. The middle child then proceeds. Otherwise, 1 think, there ia a salute. Two, who are fixed upon for the purpose, leave the group, and privately arrange that the pass-word shall be some implement of a particular trade. The trade is announced in the dialogue,?.

Silver buckles glancin', A sky-blue bonnet on his head, And oh, but he is handsome. THIS pig went to market; 2. This pig staid at home ; 3. This pig had a bit of meat ; 4. And this pig had none ; 5. This pig said, Wee, wee, wee I I can't find my way home. I'll give you a cake, If I am not mistaken. WHO is going round my sheepfold? Only poor old Jacky Lingo. Don't steal any of my black sheep. No, no more I will, only by one, Up, says Jacky Lingo. A then tries to get them back; B runs away with them; they try to shelter them- selves behind B ; A drags them off, one by one, setting them against a wall, until he has recovered all.

A regular tearing game, as children say. To London we go, To York we ride ; And Edward has pussy-cat tied to his side ; He shall have little dog tied to the other, And then he goes trid trod to see his grand- mother. THIS is the key of the kingdom. In that kingdom there is a city. In that city there is a town. In that town there is a street. In that street there is a lane. In that lane there is a yard. In that yard there is a house.

In that house there is a room. In that room there is a bed. On that bed there is a basket. In that basket there are some flowers. The child upon whom the last nnmber falls is put, for " Hide oi Sack," or any other game where a victim is required. A cock and bull storj of this kind is related of the historian Josephus. There are other versioni of this, and one may be seen in ' Blackwood's Magazine ' for August, 1H21 B. ONE old Oxford ox opening oysters ; Two tee-totums totally tired of trying to trot to Tadbury ; Three tall tigers tippling tenpeany tea ; Four fat friars fanning fainting flies ; Five frippy Frenchmen foolishly fishing for flies ; Six sportsmen shooting snipes ; Seven Severn salmons swallowing shrimps ; Eight Englishmen eagerly examining Europe; Nine nimble noblemen nibbling nonpareils ; Ten tinkers tinkling upon ten tin tinder- boxes with ten tenpenny tacks ; Eleven elephants elegantly equipt ; Twelve typographical topographers typically translating types.

GOOD horses, bad horses, What is the time of day? Three o'clock, four o'clock, Now fare you away. After the dialogue, the line passes through, and the last is caught by a sudden lowering of the anus if possible. Threescore miles and ten. Can I get there by candle-light? If your heels are nimble and light, You may get there by candle-light. CLAP hands, clap hands! Till father comes home ; For father's got money, But mother's got none. One foot up, and the other down, And that is the way to London town. HERE stands a post, Who put it there?

A better man than you ; Touch it if you dare! TRIP trap over the grass: If you please will you let one of your [eldest] daughters come, Come and dance with me? I will give you pots and pans, I will give you brass, I will give you anything for a pretty lass. I will give you gold and silver, I will give you pearl, I will give you anything for a pretty girl. Take one, take one, the fairest you may see. The fairest one that I can see Is pretty Nancy, come to ine. The dramatis persona form themselves in two parties, one representing a courtly dame and her daughters, the other the suitors of the daughters.

See Chambers' ' Popular Rhymes," p. WE are three brethren out of Spain, Come to court your daughter Jane. My daughter Jane she is too young, And has not learned her mother tongue. Be she young, or be she old, For her beauty she must be sold. Turn back, turn back, thou scornful knight, And rub thy spurs till they be bright.

Of my spurs take you no thought, For in this town they were not bought, So fare you well, my lady gay, We'll call again another day. Turn back, turn back, thou scornful knight, And take the fairest in your sight. The fairest maid that I can see, Is pretty Nancy, come to me. Here comes your daughter safe and sound, Every pocket with a thousand pound ; Every finger with a gay gold ring ; Please to take your daughter in.

Stick him up, stick him down, Stick him in the old man's crown! Mr father was a Frenchman, He bought for me a fiddle, He cut me here, he cut me here, He cut me right in the middle. Shoe the wild mare ; Put a sack on her back, See if she'll bear. If she'll bear, We'll give her some grains ; If she won't bear, We'll dash out her brains! Here sit his two men. Here sits the cock Here sit the little chickens.

Here they run in. Chinchopper, chinchopper, Chinchopper, chin! Knock at the door! Long back'd Gray Carried it away. A game to alarm children. Sheeny greeny, Sheeny greeny, Rum turn fra! Tins pig went to the bam. This eat all the corn. This said he would tell. This said he wasn't well. This went week, week, week, over the door sill. With three small children in her hand: One can brew, the other can bake, The other can make a pretty round cake.

One can sit in the garden and spin, Another can make a fine bed for the king ; Pray ma'am will you take one in? King John has sent you letters three, And begs you'll read them unto me.

Put in his thumb and pulled out a plum: stories for a Christmas pie () - Kindle edition by Ella Maria Baker. Download it once and read it on your Kindle. Put in His Thumb and Pulled Out a Plum - Stories for a Christmas Pie [Ella M. Baker] on (); ASIN: BRSU1Q; Average Customer Review: Be the first to.

The second day of Christmas, My true love sent to me Two turtle doves and A partridge in a pear tree. The third day of Christmas, My true love sent to me Three French hens, Two turtle doves, and A partridge in a pear tree. The fourth day of Christmas, My true love sent to me Pour colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle doves, and A partridge in a pear tree. The fifth day of Christmas, My true love sent to me Five gold rings, Four colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle doves, and A partridge in a pear tree. Six geese a laying, Five gold rings, Four colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle doves, and A partridge in a pear tree.

The seventh day of Christmas, My true love sent to me Seven swans a swimming, Six geese a laying, Five gold rings, Four colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle doves, and A partridge in a pear tree. The eighth day of Christmas, My true love sent to me Eight maids a milking, Seven swans a swimming, Six geese a laying, Five gold rings, Four colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle doves, and A partridge in a pear tree.

The tenth day of Christmas, My true love sent to me Ten pipers piping, Nine drummers drumming, Eight maids a milking, Seven swans a swimming, Six geese a laying, Five gold rings, Four colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle doves, and A partridge in a pear tree. Three French hens, Two turtle doves, and A partridge in a pear tree. The twelfth day of Christmas, My true love sent to me Twelve lords a leaping, Eleven ladies dancing, Ten pipers piping, Nine drummers drumming, Eight maids a milking, Seven swans a swimming, Six geese a laying, Five gold rings, Four colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle doves, and A partridge in a pear tree, [Each child in succession repeats the gifts of the day, andlorfeitR for each mistake.

Tliis accumulative process is a favorite with children: This is the way the ladies ride, Tri, tre, tre, tre, tri-tre-tre-tree! This is the way the gentlemen ride ,; Gallop-a-trot, Gallop-a-trot! This is the way the gentlemen ride, Gallop-a-gallop-a-trot! This is the way the farmers ride ; Hobbledy-hoy, Hobbledy-hoy! This is the way the farmers ride, Hobblcdy hobbledy-hoy!

Upon which the first unpacks the fingers of her hand, and waving it over head, says: Now we dance looby, looby, looby, Now we dance looby, looby, light, Shake your right hand a little And turn you round about. Now we dance looby, looby, looby, Shake your right hand a little, Shake your left hand a little, And turn you round about. Now we dance looby, looby, looby. Shake your right hand a little, Shake your left hand a little, Shake your right foot a little, Shake your left foot a little, And turn you round about.

Now we dance looby, looby, looby, Shake your right hand a little, Shake your left hand a little, Shake your right foot a little, Shake your left foot a little, Shake your head a little, And turn you round about. To buy a bunch of nettles! Pray, old Dame, what's o'clock? One, going for two. Two, going for three. Where have you been? To pick up sticks. To light my fire. What for V D. To boil my kettle. To cook some of your chickens. The children then all run away fast aa they can, and the Old Dame tries to catch one of them. Whoever is caught is the next to personate the Dame.

Children stand round in a circle, leaving a space between each. One walks round the outside, and carries a glove in her hand, saying: Another in my other hand, Hotter than that! So I sow beans, and so they come up, Some in a mug, and some in a cup. I sent a letter to my love, I lost it, I lost it! It burns, it scalds. If the pursuer makes a mistake in the pursuit, she loses, and the game is over ; otherwise she continues the itauu with the glove. Mouth eater, Chin chopper, Chin chopper. Eight and eight, and a hundred and eight.

How shall I get home to night? Spin your legs, and run fast. The miller he came With a stick on his back, Home, dog, home! The foot behind, The foot before: When he came to a stile, Thus he jumped o'er. Stukeley's second number ot ' Origincs Roystonianie,' 4to, London, , p. He follows his nose where'er he goes, And that stands all awry. It was taken from s poetical talp in the 'Clioyce Poems,' 12mo, London, 16ti2, the music to which may bt seen in U'Urtey'a 'Pills to Purge Melancholy,' , vol.

Now had these children been at home, Or sliding on dry ground, Ten thousand pounds to one penny They had not all been drown'd. You parents all that children have, And you that have got none, If you would have them safe abroad, Pray keep them safe at home. But when he saw his eyes were out, With all his might and main He jump'd into another hedge, And scratch 'd 'em in again.

UP stairs, down stairs, upon my lady's win- dow, There I saw a cup of sack and a race of ginger ; Apples at the fire, and nuts to crack, A little boy in the cream-pot up to his neck. I cou'dn't, without I cou'd, cou'd I? Cou'd you, without you cou'd, cou'd ye? Cou'd ye, cou'd ye? IF all the world was apple-pie, And all the sea was ink, And all the trees were bread and cheese, What should we have for drink?

When you're well, 'twill make you sick: I answered him, as I thought good, As many as red herrings grew in the wood. She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink: Victuals and drink were the chief of her diet ; This tiresome old woman could never be quiet. She went to the baker, to buy her some bread, And when she came home her old husband was dead ; She went to the clerk to toll the bell, And when she came back her old husband was well.

THERE was an old woman had nothing, And there came thieves to rob her ; When she cried out she made no noise, But all the country heard her. When from a place he ran away. He never at that place did stay ; And while he ran, as I am told, He ne'er stood still for young or old. He sent me a goose, without a bone ; He sent me a cherry, without a stone. He sent me a Bible, no man could read ; He sent me a blanket, without a thread. How could there be a goose without a bone? How could there be a cherry without a stone?

How could there be a Bible no man could read? How could there be a blanket without a thread? When the goose is in the egg-shell, there is no bone ; When the cherry is in the blossom, there is no stone. The bottle of beer was over-thick, So he jump'd into a club-stick ; The club-stick was over-narrow, So he jump'd into a wheel-barrow ; The wheel-barrow began to crack, So he jump'd on to a hay-stack ; The hay-stack began to blaze, So he did nothing but cough and sneeze!

There were comfits in the cabin, And apples in the hold ; The sails were made of silk, And the masts were made of gold: The four-and-twenty sailors, That stood between the decks, Were four-and-twenty white mice, With chains about their necks. The captain was a duck, With a packet on his back ; And when the ship began to move, The captain said, " Quack! IF a man who turnips cries Cries not when his father dies, It is a proof that he would rather Have a turnip than his father.

HJIjUSHY baby, my doll, I pray you don't cry, And I'll give yon some bread and some milk by and bye ; Or, perhaps you like custard, or may-be a tart, Then to either you're welcome, with all my whole heart. DANCE, little baby, dance up high, Never mind, baby, mother is by ; Crow and caper, caper and crow, There, little baby, there you go ; Up to the ceiling, down to the ground, backwards and forwards, round and round ; Dance, little baby, and mother will sing, With the merry coral, ding, ding, ding!

Home again, come again. You shall have a fishy, In a little dishy ; You shall have a fishy When the boat comes in. TOM shall have a new bonnet, With blue ribbands to tie on it, With a hush-a-bye and a lull-a-baby, Who so like to Tommy's daddy? My lady's on her death-bed, With eating half a pumpkin. J HUSH, hush, hush, hush! And I dance mine own child, And I dance mine own child, Hush, hush, hush, hush! HUSH thee, my babby, Lie still with thy daddy, Thy mammy has gone to the mill, To grind thee some wheat, To make thee some meat, And so, my dear babby, lie still.

HEY, my kitten, my kitten, And hey, my kitten, my deary! Such a sweet pet as this Was neither far nor neary. T'other little tune, T'other little tune, Pr'ythee, love, play me T'other little tune. Sing danty baby diddy. When I was a lady. O then my poor baby clid'nt cry! But my baby is weeping, For want of good keeping, Oh, I fear my poor baby will die!

RIDE, baby, ride, Pretty baby shall ride, And have a little puppy-dog tied to her side, And little pussy-cat tied to the other, And away she shall ride to see her grand- mother, To see her grandmother, To see her grandmother.

Full text of "The nursery rhymes of England"

Kissy, kiss, kissy, my honey, And cuddle your nurse, my deary. MY dear cockadoodle, my jewel, my joy, My darling, my honey, my pretty sweet boy ; Before I do rock thee with soft lullaby, Give me thy dear lips to be kiss'd, kiss'd, kiss'd. The last word is pronounced bee. Young Lambs to sell! To market, to market, To buy a plum cake ; Home again, home again, Ne'er a one baked ; The baker is dead and all his men. And we must go to market again. Who put her in? Who pulled her out? Dog with long snout. What a naughty boy was tlu;t To drown poor pussy-cat, Who never did any harm, But kill'cl the mice in his father's barn.

How many holes in a skimmer? Four and twenty, my stomach is empty ; Pray, mamma, give me some dinner. COCK a doodle doo! My dame has lost her shoe ; My master's lost his fiddling stick, And don't know what to do. Cock a doodle doo! What is my dame to do? Till master finds his fiddling stick, She'll dance without her shoe.

My dame has lost her shoe, And master's found his fiddling stick, doodle doodle doo! My dame will dance with you, While master fiddles his fiddling stick, For dame and doodle doo. Dame has lost her shoe ; Gone to bed and scratched her head, And can't tell what to do. I'll lay you a crown I'll fetch you down ; So diddledy, diddledy, dumpty. SING, sing, what shall I sing? The cat has eat the pudding-string ; Do, do, what shall I do? The cat has bit it quite in two. Give me a pancake And I'll go.

Dibbity, dibbity, dibbity, ditter, Please to give me A bit of a fritter. Pussy, come down, Or I'll crack your crown, And toss you into the sea. In a shower of rain, The miller found it, The miller ground it, And the miller gave it to Silly again. HUB a dub dub, Three men in a tub ; And who do you think they be? The butcher, the baker, The candlestick-maker ; Turn 'em out, knaves all three! HEY diddle, dinketty, poppety, pet, The merchants of London they wear scarlet ; Silk in the collar, and gold in the hem, So merrily march the merchantmen.

They went to the church, and married was she, The fly has married the humble- bee. Hey, my bonny boat, bonny boat, Hey, drag away, drag away! A CAT came fiddling out of a barn, With a pair of bag-pipes under her arm ; She could sing nothing but fiddle cum fee, The mouse has married the humble-bee ; Pipe, cat, dance, mouse, We'll have a wedding at our good house, ccccxxvi. Just then flew by a monstrous crow, As big as a tar-barrel, Which frightened both the heroes so, They quite forgot their quarrel.

J o The beer's to brew, the bread's to bake, Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, don't be too late. To market, to market, to buy a fat pig, Home again, home again, dancing a jig; Ride to the market to buy a fat hog, Hmie again, home again, jiggety-jog. The same term occurs m the dictionaries of Hollybund, Cotgnive, and Minsheu. HIGH, ding, cockatoo-moody, Make a bed in a barn, I will come to thee; High, ding, straps of leather, Two little puppy-dogs tied together ; One by the head, and one by the tail, And over the water these puppy-dogs sail.

We have endeavoured, as far as practicable, to remove every line from the present edition that could offend the most fastidious ear ; but the following annotations on a song we cannot be induced to omit, would appear to sug- gest that our endeavours are scarely likely to De attended with success. Mary, thee musn't say that, for that is a false ] ood ; thee knows a cow could never jump over the moon ; but a cow may jump under it ; so thee ought to say " The cow jumped under the moon.

How can a little dog laugh? Thee ought to say "The little dog harked to see the sport," " And the dish ran after the spoon " Stop, Mary, stop. A dish could never run after a spoon ; thee ought to know that. Thee had better say " And thu cat ran after the spoon. And with his merry daffing, He set them all a laughing. IT'S once I courted as pretty a lass, As ever your eyes did see ; But now she's come to such a pass, She never will do for me. She invited me to her own house, Where oft I'd been before, And she tumbled me into the hog- tub, And I'll never go there any more.

Who would not be ensconced in thy snug corner? Adeline Dutton Train Whitney likewise applied the nursery rhyme to opportunism in American society in Mother Goose for grown folks: The privileged little boy grows up to become "John, Esquire" and goes in search of richer plums, where he is joined in his quest by "female Horners". The schoolboy Jack Horner is put in the corner for resisting the racist and self-regarding interpretation of history given by his teacher.

But eventually the children rise up to defend him:. But when the head walked in the children made such a din. They said, "Jack get up, you got to get out, don't let them push you about, you know they'll keep you in that corner till you're dead. Jack get out, don't sell out, don't compromise with Christmas pies. Keep shouting back, you tell 'em Jack, don't swallow none of their crap. Calling Jack Horners everywhere, don't bend to authority which doesn't care, you know they'll keep you in that corner 'till you're dead.

At a basic level, the nursery rhyme's hearty celebration of appetite seems an endorsement of greediness. It was not long, therefore, before educators of the young began to rewrite the poem in order to recommend an alternative attitude. In The Renowned History of Little Jack Horner , dating from the s, generous Jack gives his pie to a poor woman on his way to school and is rewarded with a newly baked pie on his return home. The poem concludes by reversing the picture presented in the original rhyme:.

Now let every good boy, With a sweetmeat or toy, Not slyly sneak into a corner, But to playmates repair And give them a share. Lacy in the first of the expanded Juvenile Songs of her composition. After such an onslaught, it is something of a reformed Jack Horner, harnessed to educational aims, who appears on the Staffordshire Potteries ABC plates of the s [16] and s, [17] as well as on a Mintons tile for the nursery, where the feasting Jack is accompanied by a parental figure carrying keys.

In the American version, originating with the McLoughlin Brothers in , the object was to collect suits in the form of four different varieties of plum in their respective pies. And in the following century a copy of the Tacoma Times pictured a Japanese Jack pulling a battleship from the Russian pie during the Russo-Japanese war.

In the chapbook The History of Jack Horner, Containing the Witty Pranks he play'd, from his Youth to his Riper Years, Being pleasant for Winter Evenings midth century , there is a summarised version of the nursery rhyme which Jack himself is said to have composed. In the 19th century a story began to gain currency that the rhyme is actually about Thomas Horner, who was steward to Richard Whiting , the last abbot of Glastonbury before the dissolution of the monasteries under Henry VIII of England. During the journey Horner opened the pie and extracted the deeds of the manor of Mells in Somerset , which he kept for himself.

While records do indicate that Thomas Horner became the owner of the manor, both his descendants and subsequent owners of Mells Manor have asserted that the legend is untrue and that Wells purchased the deed from the abbey. A Jack Horner bibliography of books in the public domain.