Beyond the Horizon: Journeys in Poetry and Prose

Join Kobo & start eReading today
Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Beyond the Horizon: Journeys in Poetry and Prose file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Beyond the Horizon: Journeys in Poetry and Prose book. Happy reading Beyond the Horizon: Journeys in Poetry and Prose Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Beyond the Horizon: Journeys in Poetry and Prose at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Beyond the Horizon: Journeys in Poetry and Prose Pocket Guide.

If selected, your work will be read by many the world over, with copies being sent to Plymouth in Massachusetts, America. Inspire your classroom with creative writing workshops, delivered by BA Hons English with Publishing students. The workshops run between October and November to stimulate creative thinking and writing from school pupils. Works can then be submitted for consideration to be included in the published book. University of Plymouth BA Hons English with Publishing students, guided by Doctoral Teaching Assistant Sam Kemp, have carefully crafted three inspirational image packs, to stimulate imaginative writing from your pupils.

Download the three packs:. Want to become a published author? What does it mean to you?

Beyond the Horizon: Journeys in Poetry and Prose

Entries close on 23 November Entry guidelines for primary schools Entry guidelines for secondary schools Guidance for teachers. This might sound cool but it really did not work, at least for this reader. This is the authors first novel and for me it was a warning sign telling me I would not be interested in looking at future writings from the author. Aug 13, Lissa rated it it was ok Shelves: I tried to get into this book. I started it and restarted it a few different times in the span of two years, but I just can't do it.

Want to become a published author?

It's a bummer, because the book sounded really interesting. Part of my problem is that I can't keep the characters straight in my head. None of them are named; they are just "the man" or "the boy" or "the stranger. Female characters are few and far between, and their only purposes i I tried to get into this book. Female characters are few and far between, and their only purposes in life appear to be 1 available for sexual intercourse, whether they want to be or not; and 2 to die to further the male characters' journeys this is more popularly known as "fridging".

beyond the horizon beyond

The timeline jumps around so much that it's difficult to follow, especially since, as I've already stated, it's already difficult enough trying to figure out which character is doing what. And I really hate when authors try to change the rules of the English language to make their books stand out in this case, the author leaves out apostrophes for contractions: It's really annoying, and it really detracts from my enjoyment of the book.

I'll let a few author slide Cormac McCarthy's "The Road" comes to mind because their books were just so fucking amazing that I could get past it, but I can't in this case. I tried one last time yesterday to get into this book, and I can't. I just reviewed this on Amazon, and I'm going to copy that review here: Beyond the Horizon is a fantastic debut novel, a great read for any fans of Cormac McCarthy.

  1. Related news?
  2. Plymouth Anthology of Young People's Writing - University of Plymouth.
  3. beyond the horizon beyond - Vishwakarma Publications!
  4. Print Edition.
  5. Perversions discrètes (Les érotiques dEsparbec t. 11) (French Edition).

The concise prose and cryptic dialogue are right up your alley, if you're a fan of McCarthy. There's also a strong likeness to Patrick DeWitt in the writing. It's hard to pinpoint just what's great about the book. Like anything, there's an x-factor in it that keeps you reading. Or kept me reading, at least. If I was forced to put into I just reviewed this on Amazon, and I'm going to copy that review here: If I was forced to put into words what drew me into this book, it'd be that all the words, scenes, punctuation are completely necessary, and there's enough left out to give the reader the feeling of discovery as the story progresses.

Nothing in the book is superfluous.

ASMR - How to Analyze Poems in a Larger Context, beyond the poem itself (Educational)

It's obvious a lot of work was put into this book, and I'm sure Ireland cut out a lot of stuff that, as a writer, seemed necessary in preceding drafts, but the end result makes all that work totally worth it. Another comparison I'd make for the book is to the film High Plains Drifter which is my favorite western film. It has that supernatural background feel as Ireland plays with concepts of time, and he does this without disorienting the reader. A word of warning: Pick up some Dan Brown, if you're that kind of reader.

If you're not that kind of reader, pick this book up immediately. You will not be disappointed. I work with Ryan and was able to read an advance copy of this book. Goodreads does a nice job of summarizing the book without giving away spoilers, so I will not attempt to summarize here. It is a haunting tale that will keep you thinking long after you have finished reading it. The world Ryan Disclaimer: The world Ryan creates is unrelentingly dark. It makes for good storytelling.

Overall, the book is highly unconventional. Ryan creates a timeline that uses flashbacks and multiple storylines some of which go back to prehistoric times. He uses a stark style that matches the desert settings and bleak world. The category this might fit into the best is the anti-Western since he is constantly subverting the genre and making the reader rethink the history of the West. Apr 14, Tuck rated it really liked it Shelves: What a load of balls. I was sent this book by the wonderful Oneworld Publications In frontier America, a man lives with a pregnant woman who is not his wife.

Set in America with a menacing and dark underlying story, it was everything I look for in a book and more. I initially found it difficult to decipher between the two main characters as neither were referred to by a name, but I picked it up soon enough and found it easy enough to understand who was who. The story takes the reader on a journey to frontier America where a man is living with a pregnant woman who is not his wife.

He has taken the woman in, given her shelter, and has told her he will help her raise the baby. Soon, and quite out of nowhere, a stranger arrives at their residence and advises that the baby will need to be registered, otherwise the woman and baby will be deported if the authorities stumble across them.

Fearing losing them both, the man sets out on a journey to a fabled military outpost with the mission of registering both mother and baby while the stranger volunteers to stay behind and look after the woman. Not long after the man departs, the stranger murders the woman and her unborn child and sets off in pursuit of the man he has sent to the fictional outpost. Overall, I really enjoyed this book.

Reward Yourself

It kept the pace well, and was suitably gory enough for my liking without going too over the top with details, that may have put other readers off. There were, however, a couple of places within the story that irritated me, mainly the insertion of complete sections of dialogue in Spanish. However, due to the other characters not understanding the spanish pieces being said, their replying lines did nothing to help me understand what was actually being said.

Further information

This led me to having to google lengths of dialogue when I got home to try and decipher what had been said. Other than that, as mentioned above, I did really enjoy this book. I found it easy to get back into after putting it down and would certainly recommend it to friends of mine. It was the first book I had read from Oneworld, and I would be interested in reading more publications from them, they have a really fresh taste in books and authors, which I like.

So, in a nutshell, read this book. A very exciting read. Sep 20, Kacanderson rated it it was amazing. This book is a provocative page-turner! I read it over a few days, unable to put it down for long! I am a Reader by nature, and I usually only bother with award-winning books. It's strong in the same way as "The Road". It's visceral and bold. The form is more of a parable with nameless main characters: It might be thought of as Magic Realism as it blends time travel with a realisti This book is a provocative page-turner!

It might be thought of as Magic Realism as it blends time travel with a realistic setting. Only some of the laws of nature apply. As you follow the characters' journeys, you will find yourself believing in the unbelievable! By the end, you will feel hyper sensitized to the present and hyper aware of the power of time itself. My ordinary life felt "colorized", more vibrant! Even now, weeks later, I find myself wandering back to the imagery Ireland created.

What is Kobo Super Points?

Randy Baker was born in Nashville, Tennessee, grew up outside of Kingston, Jamaica, has travelled halfway around the globe and is now settled back in. Editorial Reviews. About the Author. Randy Baker was born in Nashville, Tennessee, grew up outside of Kingston, Jamaica, has travelled halfway around the.

I can taste the earth in the tunnels and mines. I can feel the wind coming off the plains. I can see the time-lapse photos of the fort being built and destroyed. The cycle of life made real.

See a Problem?

Download the three packs:. It is almost impossible to pick out favourites from this book, but here is my vain attempt to point the ones and many more I have so loved. Soon after he departs, the stranger kills the woman and her unborn child and then sets off in pursuit of the man. Atwood even slips the occasional sly reference to the underground as a site of subconscious inspiration into non-fiction pieces that most readers would take literally. The sun leaves merely and the underworld emerges. It is much later that you realize the layers in those shades, the emotions behind the imagery, theaesthetics beyond the painting. Oct 02, E.

Thank you, Ryan Ireland! The world is a better place for your gift. May 13, David rated it liked it Shelves: There's some things to like here, but it just didn't quite come off for me. Read about half, skimmed the rest. There's a good boldness, a refusal to look away from some horrors, but the touches start to add up to less than more after a while, and we're probably still in a moment where you're better off, as a writer, not wandering anywhere too close to Cormac McCarthy's territory. He's managed to dance along the line between dark sublimity and ridiculousness, against all odds, but that doesn't me There's some things to like here, but it just didn't quite come off for me.

He's managed to dance along the line between dark sublimity and ridiculousness, against all odds, but that doesn't mean you can do it too. Aug 23, Cesar Camba rated it did not like it Shelves: I haven't got much to add to the reviewer below who said it's a load of balls, other than, I'm a native Spanish speaker and my annoyance at the book was only increased by the direness of the 'GoogleTranslate' type Spanish. Feb 03, Debe rated it really liked it.

Ireland is definitely a writer to watch. Not my usual genre apocalyptic Western , but I appreciated the intricate plot and beautiful prose. Sep 12, Carole B rated it liked it. Ireland innovates in this book.

  1. Description.
  2. 101 Remedies for a dull life.
  3. JOURNEYS: Stories Our Bodies Can Tell (The CraniOcean Trilogy Book 2).