Quantum Revolution III — What is Reality? (Quantam revolution Book 3)

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The beautiful and beguiling concepts of quantum theory have attracted many expositors, several of whom have responded with grace and whimsy. Together, these books introduce some of the most interesting and consequential ideas of modern physics. Feynman developed these lectures half a century ago; they remain among the most acclaimed introductions to the subject. With his famously clear exposition, Feynman lures readers into the quantum world: Not exactly a popular book—later chapters delve more concertedly into quantitative calculation—this classic introduction rewards disciplined and curious readers.

Gamow was an accomplished theoretical physicist who helped invent the big-bang model of the universe. He was also an inveterate practical jokester. In he created the endearing Mr Tompkins, a bank clerk with a hankering for science. Gamow's main trick was to play with the constants of nature so that Tompkins could experience its exotic effects on a human scale. Slow the speed of light, for example, and bicyclists' wristwatches betray all the effects of Einstein's relativity. Increase Planck's constant, and suddenly billiard balls in a pub dissolve into interpenetrating puffs of probability.

These lighthearted stories offer a taste of the curiosities of modern physics. This collection derives from a series of radio interviews with leading physicists. The opening chapter provides an accessible, brief introduction to quantum theory and broaches several competing perspectives on how best to make sense of its implications. The interviews capture a moment in time, during the mids, when several leading physicists began to grapple again with the interpretation of quantum theory, a subject that had largely been shunted aside.

This life of quantum architect Werner Heisenberg captures the sweep and drama of his early years. A wunderkind who received his doctorate at 22, Heisenberg introduced his version of quantum mechanics just two years later and followed up soon after that with the famous uncertainty principle.

I wish I could say I understand it better, but maybe it's appropriate that a book that delves into the question of what quantum theory actually "means" should leave the reader feeling a little stranded at the further limits of what's intelligible in words, pictures, and analogies drawn from everyday experience. Mar 15, Srihari rated it really liked it. The book gives a condensed history of the modern physics. Each chapter is dedicated to a scientist starting with Max Plank to Einstein to Bhor to and the final verdicts on quantum mechanics that world now agrees on.

The author presents a nice proportionate view of different aspects childhood, personal, professional of the life of the scientists without every missing a rudimentary explanation of the physical principles each scientist unfolded with their discoveries of new things and how it even The book gives a condensed history of the modern physics. The author presents a nice proportionate view of different aspects childhood, personal, professional of the life of the scientists without every missing a rudimentary explanation of the physical principles each scientist unfolded with their discoveries of new things and how it eventually led to a weird world of quantum.

The personal flaws of each scientist were also subtly pointed out which made them a bit human for me after finishing the book. For anyone who likes or remotely interested in physics, I highly recommend this book. For sure it'll clear up what quantum means when the physics people use it. The author juggles a lot of different scientists in chapters to make a lot of connections which makes the reading a bit chaotic. So a rating of 4 instead of 5. But I guess the microscopic quantum world itself is chaotic.

Feb 25, Harishankkar GK rated it really liked it.

This book gave life to most of the physics stuff I learnt. Stories behind all the amazing discoveries in the quantum world is vividly written. The struggles and contradictions among the brilliant scientists during the evolution of quantum mechanics are well-explained. It has been a wonderful journey. Even while keeping the weirdness of the quantum realm intact, this book will make the subject all the more likeable.

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Apr 03, Mike W rated it liked it Shelves: This is a good recounting of the historical development of quantum physics. It tells the story through a series of biographies of the major players--Planck, Bohr, Einstein, Schrodinger, etc The book contains a lot of interesting information about the confusion felt by these great physicists as they tried to understand the implications of their experimental results and mathematical theories.

It became clear over time that the assumptions of classical physics were not valid at the subatomic lev This is a good recounting of the historical development of quantum physics.

It became clear over time that the assumptions of classical physics were not valid at the subatomic level, though Einstein, Planck and Schrodinger were never fully comfortable with the rejection of classical determinism and causality. There had been a long-standing dispute in physics about whether light was a particle or a wave.

Ironically, it was Einstein who revived the particle theory of light, arguing that light was emitted in discrete quanta or photons. For a long time, the dominant interpretation of quantum mechanics espoused by Bohr, Heisenberg and others depicted electrons and photons as having dual particle and wave aspects, but denied that they were either particles or waves unless measured by some observer. This was the famous "Copenhagen Interpretation" in which the wave and particle aspect were "complementary".

Moreover, these "particles" were really essentially indeterminate. As Heisenberg showed, it was impossible to estimate their position and momenta with perfect precision, not because of the limits of our knowledge or the imprecision of the measuring devices used, but because this uncertainty or indeterminacy were inherent characteristics of phenomena at a subatomic scale. Until someone took a measurement, it did not make sense to say the particle is at such and such a place.

The particles simply were "potentialities", or probabilities. And reality was not really real until someone took a measurement. And, while marginalized over the last decades of his life, Einstein might well be vindicated, at least in part. Strangely, the book does not mention "String Theory" which might prove to be the "Theory of Everything" than Einstein hoped in vain to discover. Again, the book tells this story well. It explains clearly the difficult concepts involved in the early debates about quanta, and gives the reader a sense of the personalities involved int these debates. It points out that Heisenberg, who won the Nobel prize for the creation of "matrix mechanics" didn't understand matrices, that Bohr, the champion of the quanta, strangely refused to accept that light too was quantized, that Schrodinger failed to understand his own wave equation, and so on Such was the confusion into which physicists had plunged.

But in its matter of fact style, the book fails to convey the majesty of the subject, or to explain with sufficient energy the fascination it holds even for intelligent laymen.

It's good, but it could have been better. Manjit Kumar's book is a fascinating history of one of the most fundamental areas of science. Just as the title says, it is a history of the great debate about the nature of reality with Einstein and Neils Bohr leading the opposing views. Quantum Mechanics has always been a fascinating subject for me, mainly because I could never hope to understand it enough, however much time I spent on it. This brilliant work takes you through the history of the ideas behind quantum mechanics from the late 19th Manjit Kumar's book is a fascinating history of one of the most fundamental areas of science.

This brilliant work takes you through the history of the ideas behind quantum mechanics from the late 19th century all the way till the latter half of 20th century. Their works are captured along with a short historical background to provide the context. Then the stage is all set for the great question about the nature of reality.

Bohr and Heisenberg and many others insist that there is no objective reality. There is only an abstract quantum mechanical description. It is wrong to think that the task of physics to find out how nature is. Physics concerns what we can say about nature. Einstein and his Princeton team produce an ingenious thought-experiment called EPR that casts a major shadow on the Bohr-Heisenberg view called the 'Copenhagen Interpretation'.

However, for all practical purposes, most scientists by the midth century accept the Copenhagen view and get on with their science. Albert Einstein toiled till his death to find a Unified Field theory from which he hoped to derive the laws of Quantum Mechanics. But he wasn't successful. The book brings out the essence of those exhilarating times in science when great minds battle year after year on the nature of Reality amidst two major world wars and the looming threats of fascism and communism.

In spite of their battles for decades, both Bohr and Einstein were such great human beings, having a great regard and affection for one another. The other giants like de Broglie, Pauli, Heisenberg and Schroedinger also show great respect and regard for their opponents' views and keep egos and personalities out of the equation.

Manjit Kumar's narrative brings out all these essential human qualities quite vividly. He has a great ability to write. The book is lucid and delightfully accessible in spite of the difficult subject matter. I enjoyed reading it immensely. In many ways, it is like a thriller, as you keep looking for the next thought experiment that Einstein would come up with to counter Bohr only to find out how the Copenhagen team overcomes each of these hurdles.

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Quantum Revolution III — What is Reality? (Quantam revolution Book 3). G Venkataraman. Kindle Edition. $ · At the Speed of Light. G Venkataraman. Look inside this book. Bose and His Statistics by Quantum Revolution I — The Breakthrough (Quantam Revolution Book 1). Quantum Revolution I Quantum Revolution III — What is Reality? (Quantam revolution Book 3). G Venkataraman.

I would recommend it strongly to anyone interested in popular science in general and Quantum Mechanics in particular. Jun 01, Menglong Youk rated it it was amazing Shelves: However, it doesn't mean that quantum mechanics cannot be understood whatsoever. With persistence, patience, and attention, some level of understanding could be reached. Einstein, Bohr, and the Great Debate about the Nature of Reality" written by Manjit Kumar is a book attempting to guide you through the rich history behind this revolution: There were two groups among these men: Copenhagen Interpretation states that a physical system does not have a definite property prior to being measured, which means that before being measured, its property is just the cloud of probability.

This obscures the nature of reality because nothing is real until observed, and Einstein felt bothered by it.

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The debate between Einstein and Borh spanned for 3 decades until their death. On the drawing board on the day Bohr died was Einstein's light box which Einstein used to argue with Borh thirty years ago. This, I must admit, made me tear up. I've read books and watched many documentaries about quantum mechanics before. Yet, each time I re-encounter the contents, my grasp of the subject appears to be pity, miniscule even. The concept of bell theorem is still annoyingly out of reach for me despite my reading about it from various sources many times already.

Maybe one day when I have a firm grip and a more stable basic understanding on this subject, all the remaining unreachable concepts would be within my grasp. If you desire to know more about quantum mechanics, I would totally recommend this book, for it is presented in not-too-technical styles, thus making the probability of your being able to grasp it a bit higher even if you don't have any background of physics or mathematics.

Sep 25, Steve rated it it was amazing Shelves: Like a good novel, this kept me gripped to the very end thanks to a perfect balance between hard science and human interest. The first thing you notice about the book is the detail. Copiously researched, Kumar has pulled together a truly impressive array of material, both personal and professional, constructing a rich history that transports you to the subject's golden age and to the lives of the key players. He tells a story so engrossing and so detailed that I felt surprisingly moved towards t Like a good novel, this kept me gripped to the very end thanks to a perfect balance between hard science and human interest.

He tells a story so engrossing and so detailed that I felt surprisingly moved towards the end. Yes, by a book on quantum theory. The great debate itself is a tremendously invigorating one. Both Einstein and Bohr agreed that quantum mechanics was correct. Where they disagreed was in whether or not it was complete. In fact the implications of this disagreement went deeper, calling into question the fundamental role of physics itself, and whether there is even such a thing to be measured as an independent objective reality.

On this, the author's background in physics and philosophy are put to good use. So this is science, history, philosophy, biography. A well-written book that feeds the brain and the heart. Mar 21, Rohan rated it really liked it Shelves: This book provides simplistic and yet excellent history of Quantum Physics. I particularly liked the part which mentions rivalry between Schrodinger and Heisenberg. I was finally able to understand though still not clearly, why Einstein is considered as the father if you call Max Planck the grandfather of quantum theory.

I have to admit I need to go through this book one more time to completely understand the technical arguments, though they were very few throughout the book. Overall, I would sa This book provides simplistic and yet excellent history of Quantum Physics. Overall, I would say this book was more about history than about the actual science. I really liked the last chapter of the book.

It made me realize how far we have come as species in deriving and making complex conclusions about nature. I always knew about the greatness of Einstein but with this book, I also came to understand how important of a figure Bohr was to the Quantum world. All in all, a great book about great people to have ever lived among us. Jun 20, Nick Gotch rated it it was amazing. Quantum was an excellent history of the quantum revolution that began in the early 20th century. It touches on all the main characters in the development of quantum theory and subsequent development of quantum mechanics.

There's a good bit of biographical and world history in the mix and you really get into the lives of these pivotal scientists, their passions, theories, interests, and lives. There is a fair bit of math and physics along the way, some parts get pretty heavy into it, but mostly th Quantum was an excellent history of the quantum revolution that began in the early 20th century.

There is a fair bit of math and physics along the way, some parts get pretty heavy into it, but mostly this is a historical biography of Plank, Einstein, Bohr, Heisenberg, Schrodinger, etc.. Anyone familiar with the science of the quantum will enjoy it and probably even gain some interesting insight into the history of the field.

I loved the story and I'm marking "Quantum: Jun 07, Jose rated it really liked it. I've heard many anecdotal stories about quantum physics but this a great book that paints the broad strokes as told through the lives of the scientists who invented it. This book specifically focuses on the metaphysical debates between Einstein and Bohr and the fundamental implications it has for the nature of reality itself.

It is great stuff. It is also heavy stuff, but a good escape for nerds like me. I think it would be interesting for anyone who has wondered about "Schrodi Fascinating book. I think it would be interesting for anyone who has wondered about "Schrodinger's Cat" or what Einstein's famous quote "God does not play dice" meant. It is fun to think about these deep problems of science itself alongside the greats.

HIghly recommended if you want to get a taste of what Nobel laureates fight about. If you have little to no familiarity with quantum physics, this might be a tough one for you. But even if the concepts are flying over your head as a couple did for me, despite a fair amount of familiarity with quantum mechanics and particle physics , the history and discussion of the various personalities and relationships will still be worth your time. Great history of science.

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Manjit Kumar takes a very complicated topic, quantum mechanics and breaks down into understandable language. It is just like hearing a really good lecture, you want to know what happens next. This is the history of quantum mechanics from Plank, Eisenstein, Bohr, Heisenberg, Pauli, Schrodinger, Bell and others that contributed to quantum mechanisms. Really an incredible book about Quantum Mechanics He explains history, theories, paradox and lot more things in a descriptive manner which can be understood by a layman.

He explain raise certain of future present and history of quantum mechanics. Read twice if you wanna understand concepts in depth However this is not a. But doesn't deal with the subject mathematically. Thus, you can't learn anything seriously. For beginners who want to get a glimpse of quantum physics, the book is ok. It explains quantum mechanics in a very lucid tone but many deep topics are missing from this and obviously everything can't be explained in a book.

The best book written for a layman for quantum mechanics. This not a standard textbook treating the quantum mechanics but a readable account of the development of quantum mechanics.

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The struggles and contradictions among the brilliant scientists during the evolution of quantum mechanics are well-explained. Copiously researched, Kumar has pulled together a truly impressive array of material, both personal and professional, constructing a rich history that transports you to the subject's golden age and to the lives of the key players. Retrieved May 23, Whereas common digital computing requires that the data be encoded into binary digits bits , each of which is always in one of two definite states 0 or 1 , quantum computation uses quantum bits or qubits , which can be in superpositions of states. Retrieved 17 February The Story of Quantum Theory.

Physics revisited with this book, and also got to know some of the unknown things of quantum world. See all 28 reviews. Would you like to see more reviews about this item? See all customer images. Most recent customer reviews. Published 4 days ago.

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