Oogy: The Dog Only a Family Could Love


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If not for the kindhearted manager of the animal hospital, Oogy probably would have been put down, but she refused to give up on him and convinced the vet who was her business partner to try to save him. They and other kind, loving people became instrumental in giving Oogy the life he deserved.

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I think it's a real testament to Oogy's personality and determination that he lived at all, much less was so sweet and docile throughout his surgeries and recovery. He obviously had an extraordinary tolerance for pain. During his early years with the Levins, Oogy had a penchant for mischief and destruction, but his family exhibited the patience of Job with him, understandably not wanting to cause him any more fear after everything he'd been through already.

Levin's words are any indication, I'd say that Oogy has brought the author and his family far more joy than heartache or frustration. Unforunately, poor Oogy had to go through several more surgeries. Some were for the purpose of reconstructing his damaged face, and all I can say is God bless Dr. Bianco, the veterinarian who performed these surgeries and all other routine medical care for Oogy free of charge for his lifetime. There were other surgeries for torn ACLs that Dr.

Bianco couldn't perform and for which the Levins had to pay large fees. They also had to patiently go through the rehabilitative process with him, and again, all I can say is God bless the Levins for their dedication and willingness to invest all their time and money to give this poor misfortunate dog a good life. I think our pets often choose us, and that appears to be exactly what Oogy did. After reading the chapter 'Signs', it became even more apparent that Oogy was simply meant for the Levins.

There is a chapter in the book about how Mr. Levin and his wife, Jennifer, came to adopt their twin sons, which I thought was very relevant. It shows what huge hearts these people have and how much family means to them. Oogy became a part of all that the minute he went home with them. The Levin house was brimming with love, kindness and patience which was exactly what Oogy needed. Larry Levin's love for Oogy is very apparent, and he definitely thinks of Oogy as far more than just a dog. This animal has become a constant friend and companion.

I don't think Oogy could have asked for a better family to spend his life with. In the last chapter, Mr. Levin mentioned trying to get Oogy certified to be a therapy dog, and I think he'd be great at it. I wish they had a website to keep readers updated, but I couldn't find any info as to whether Oogy successfully completed this training. It does appear though, that Mr. Oogy's story needed to be told. All of their stories need to be told. I had one main problem with the book and aside from that my comments will all be personal.

My main problem - Levin's writing. I've tried to not think too harshly because after all Levin isn't an author. I find it kind of amusing that when I read the first few pages I immediately thought to myself that Levin had to be a journalist or a lawyer. But his writing is very Far, far, far too detailed.

Like, I don't care that he sleeps on the left side of his bed, or that he turns his doorknob to the right. I know he microwaves his coffee for 50 seconds. I don't want to know that. I don't want to know that much about my own kids life! It makes me wonder, since I know nothing about how publishing works, if maybe someone okay'd the book and gave him a minimum page count? But no, I think this is just him. Which is fine but it doesn't work extremely well in written form.

His writing is very bare. I think it would have done good to have had someone helping him along with this. I don't like flowery, overly descriptive writing and it's the reason I stay away from certain kinds of fiction. You usually don't meet up with that in this sort of book. Unless this is something that would bother you to great extremes I say try it. It's quick, just over pages, and it's meaningful. I don't agree with everything Levin writes about but a true animal lover he is.

And I also want to point out, in case he ever reads this, he has multiple reasons to be proud of those boys of his. I'm sure he knows this but if what's written about them here is true, wow. I can only hope my daughter is like them when she's their age. I almost forgot, does anyone think color photos were left out for a reason? Because of Oogy's looks? I wish they'd been included. Oogy isn't scary looking to me. I'd be hesitant to go up to him by myself or with my daughter without first asking permission but we do that with every dog.

That should be done with every dog. If the owner said it was okay I'd be all over him and so would my daughter. I think he's beautiful. About the personal stuff. One of the doctors involved with Oogy's care had a young boy come into his hospital years earlier. Or what I'm led to believe was years earlier - it doesn't actually say.

The young boy had a torn up pit with him, was crying, and said his dog was attacked. Bianco fixed the dog up, handed him back and went about his business. If he did this without charging the child, which I have to assume by the info here, he should be commended, that's rare as hell these days. Several months later the kid came back. Same dog, same injuries, same act. Bianco stepped to the kid and told him he knew he was fighting the dog. So what did he do? Did he take the dog? Even call the kids parents?

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He fixed the dog up - again - handed him over and told him to not bring him back. There is nothing included here about him trying to talk to the young boy, maybe to school him on dog fighting and what happens, etc. One can only think of what that dogs time after that entailed. I'm sure his time on this earth ended by now. Not very professional IMO but certainly nothing having to do with the writing of this book.

Something I wanted to mention. Whenever I hear someone talk about how a dog can't, or they think they can't, understand certain words I laugh. While certain breeds are more capable of learning and understanding, most, if not all, dogs will understand some words at some point. My Lab knows all of the usuals, 'want to go for a ride?

He knows an insane amount of non-usuals like 'belly scratches', 'medicine', 'Julia', 'mailbox', 'ham', 'cheese', 'apartment', and I could keep going. And these are all words that are not associated with anything. Not with any special time of day, activity, mood, nothing. He knows the words. I don't consider that all that crazy myself. Maybe because I've been around dogs all my life. Aren't animals as a whole fairly intelligent? This makes me want to write down a complete - or as complete as possible - list of all the words Scooter knows. Just to see it in front of me.

I may have to do that now. I want to meet Oogy. I want to drive to his town and sit somewhere until he walks by.

Oogy has ratings and reviews. Kim said: I really wanted to love this book--it had all the traits of a tearjerker--abused puppy left for dead. Oogy: The Dog Only a Family Could Love [Larry Levin] on uzotoqadoh.tk *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Now in paperback, the New York.

I want to pet him and I want to look in his eyes. I want to give him a kiss. Maybe one day I'll get to do that. Until then I'll be happy that he's made it to where he is now, that he's surrounded by love and great people, and that I got to know a little about his life. View all 7 comments. Read a memoir or narrative nonfiction book. I actually read this months ago but forgot to mark it as read or write a review for it.

Which probably says something. I am a dog lover. I think I've made that clear. I enjoy stories about animals and about their own stories of hope. I myself have a big 95 pound monster that I don't know how I could live without, and thinking of him being hurt is like thinking of my kid being hurt. So I understand why people get crazy about their animals. And this is the Read a memoir or narrative nonfiction book. And this is the second animal memoir I've read. Both of them dealt with the everyday life of dealing with a pet that was both a rescued and b disabled in some way.

I enjoyed this book better than Homer's Odyssey partly because I am a dog person and partly because this author was far less irritating. Larry Levin really writes his memoir about himself and his family and their eventual adoption of Oogy into that family so the book was not only about the dog, which I think helped with my enjoyment of it.

He and his wife adopted twin boys several years before adopting a disabled dog. He spoke very openly about his fears of fatherhood and the idea that his kids may not feel as accepted because of the fact that they were adopted. However, this family I read about had such warmth and life to them I couldn't help but fall a little in love with all.

When they finally adopted Oogy, the twins found a kindred spirit with him immediately, perhaps owing to their own adopted status. The way they all accepted and loved this dog right off the bat was very heartwarming. Larry and the twins meet Oogy when they took their beloved cat to the vet to be put down. They were devastated and emotional, but on their way out, saw this dog that they instantly fell in love with.

He was missing an ear and part of his jaw, looked beat up and mangled, and was perhaps the ugliest dog they had ever seen. But the energy and the love given off by him was immediate and sucked them in. All three knew that he was theirs. And so begins life with Oogy, filled with funny stories, touching memories, and lots of obstacles in the road.

Oogy was a Dogo Argentino similar to a pit bull but larger and friendlier puppy that was used as a bait dog in an underground dog fighting ring. When the raid happened that broke up the ring, Oogy was completely mangled and clinging to life. A veterinary surgeon saw something in the pup that was worth saving, and refused to give up on him, saving his life, nursing him back to health, and providing countless hours of therapy in the hopes that he could have a somewhat normal life.

There really are still good people in the world. The story of where Oogy came from really broke my heart, especially since knowing that these types of things happen all the time. And Oogy was really one of the lucky ones. So many innocent pups die all the time because greedy humans use them for their own selfish means. A rage unlike anything I've felt hovered over me constantly as I was reading about Oogy's recovery. It is amazing how little humanity some humans can have sometimes. All in all, I enjoyed this story very much. It was not the most action-packed or page-turning story in the world, but it definitely tugged on my heartstrings.

Seriously, how could you not love this? Mar 24, Luis rated it it was amazing Shelves: Lufu, the Old English word for love, is why Larry Levin chose "Oogy" when the badly disfigured pit bull puppy jumped into his own adopted boys' laps and lives. Levin's lufu is profound and we are all so much better off because of Oogy. Oogy is such a heartwarming tale. I have never heard of the breed, Dogos, before reading this book and the author did such a nice job of making this dog jump off the pages.

The story begins with the adoption of twin boys, the death of a beloved cat and finding the love of Levin family's life in the form of an abused dog. I have read many stories about dog fighting but didn't really know much about the use of "bait dogs" since I would guess the majority of them don't survive. Oogy is a very speci Oogy is such a heartwarming tale. Oogy is a very special dog to have survived this traumatic experience and the Levins are a very special family to see through the ugly appearance of this wonderful animal.

Dogs can really become part of the family and you love all of your family no matter what they look like. Oogy's personality triumphs over any outward defects. This is truly a book of courage and love. I recommend it to any dog lover! View all 6 comments. Jul 05, Chance Lee rated it did not like it Shelves: I made a shelf for "Yahtzee books": As a Yahtzee book, Oogy is a five stars.

Bearing down on Oogy, my pencil marks were sharp and clear. As an actual book, Oogy is Dullsville. It's a happy little story about a rescue dog who lives. There also tons of unnecessary details. Have you ever wondered how long a boring lawyer microwaves his coffee in the morning? Or what his morning routine is?

Or I made a shelf for "Yahtzee books": Or how he cooks bacon? If so, this book is for you! This is Larry Levin's only book, besides some lawyer self-help book no one has read. When the book isn't tediously detailing how Larry cares for and walks Oogy, it's filled with statements about how much he loves his family. Writing , which Levin has not passed with this book, is "show, don't tell.

One thing I have learned about people and their writing, is that generally what they say is the exact opposite of the truth. That makes me wonder about Larry's family life. He says he and his family are this close loving family unit, yet he is always avoiding his sons and his wife is never home in the few scenes he writes. Instead, Levin prefers to spend all his time with the dog because Oogy loves and appreciates him unconditionally.

What is the point of this book? The cynical part of me i. See how much I love you? I wrote a book about it. I hope he donated all proceeds of this book to animal rights charities. Levin preaches about how people should do everything for their pets, which yes, I agree, but he never reflects on how lucky he is to have the time and the money to devote his entire life to Oogy's well-being. It insinuates that dog fighters are poor, black, and from broken homes, and therefore don't deserve to have dogs or families. Only rich, white people should have kids or pets.

There is a scene where he asks his son how he feels about being adopted, and his son says, and I'm paraphrasing because I didn't bring this Yahtzee book home with me, "It's a part of me. Like how I'm a Caucasian male. I never think about how my life would be if I wasn't, because it's a part of me.

But I don't do "heartwarming. The reason this book is "happy" and "sweet" is because it ignores any details that aren't. This book is like reading someone's Facebook feed -- Levin posts only the happy memories and he crops out all the sadness. That gets about two paragraphs. More space is devoted to Levin imagining what Oogy dreams about.

Oogy: The Dog Only a Family Could Love

Oogy dreams of Larry, naturally. I considered giving this book two stars because Oogy is cute, but no. Levin wrote this book -- and he cooks bacon in the microwave -- so it gets one star. If it were written from Oogy's perspective, I may have rated it higher. That would be a better book.

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Jul 14, Perri rated it really liked it. Oogy's story is a dog's ability to rise above human cruelty and still show love, forgiveness and sweetness. His early abuse as fighting dog bait is mercifully brief and can only be guessed at. I liked how the author was open about his family relationships, his twin son's adoption and Oogy's health and behavioral issues. It was a nice change that Oogy was still alive at the end of the book and an afterword shared letters from an affected public. Feb 28, Becca T.

I expected a fast paced story of a dog who was abused then adopted into a loving family. I'm not saying that the dog wasn't adopted and cared for by a loving family, I'm saying that the way it was written made me want to set it down and read another book. Oogy is a story about a young dog who was used as a fighting dog. He was the bait, the beginning of the fight. He was hurt severly and left to die. He was brought into the vet and they fixed him up and put him up for adoption. Nobody thought anyone in their right mind would adopt a dog that had lost and ear and was mangled.

When Larry Levin and his family walked into the animal hospital to put their cat to sleep, they imediatley saw Oogy. It was love at first sight. They adopted the loving animal. The description makes the book sound oh so appealing to every dog or animal lover. The truth is, the book is very, very detailed. They make the story drag on and on. The first chapter alone made me want to fall asleep. Levin talk in depth about his morning routine and how long the coffee should stay put and how long something it microwaved. The point of this story isn't to get to know the author, though in a sense, maybe it is.

The story is about the dog. Granted, you do get to learn a lot about he dog, like the fact that he's not actually a pitbull- he's a Dogo Argentina. That is a rare breed in the United States that is often used for fighting. People who would like this book are animal lovers. If you love reading about animals, this book is for you. The hope it leaves you with is different from other books.

Overall, Oogy is a book of hope about a loving, mangled, happy, friendly dog. How could you not fall in love with Oogy, even after all that he has been through, he is still such a friendly, happy dog. Maybe not the most well behaved sleeping on the table, taking food out of the fridge but I guess he can't be perfect: We need more animal loving people like that in the world. I liked the book because of Oogy but I didnt love it, it started very slow. With an extremely detailed telling o How could you not fall in love with Oogy, even after all that he has been through, he is still such a friendly, happy dog.

With an extremely detailed telling of the authors morning routine from getting out of bed to making his sons breakfast. I wanted to know about Oogy!!! I do love a Happy Ever After: Aug 13, Amy rated it it was amazing Shelves: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. At first, I thought this book was going to contain a lot about the author's family and history, and that he was going to tell a lot about how his sons came to him and about their lives growing up.

I was happy though to learn about Oogy, and all he went through. He sounds like a very special dog, and after what he went through and still being able to trust in people shows that he was even more special than most. Most dogs that are used as bait I wouldn't imagine being able to trust a human automa At first, I thought this book was going to contain a lot about the author's family and history, and that he was going to tell a lot about how his sons came to him and about their lives growing up.

Most dogs that are used as bait I wouldn't imagine being able to trust a human automatically if ever, but Oogy did. One thing I don't like about this book is the title about a dog only a family could love. I have never met Oogy and I love him, and I think that everyone who reads this book will love him too. I think that if the story had been told from a family perspective, as not just the author, but his wife Jennifer, and his sons Noah and Dan had each told a little of what Oogy means to them in the story, it would have really made for a great story about a family that took in a dog that was looking for a family to love him, and how that dog became one of the most important pets they would ever encounter.

The fact that Oogy went through so much in his life before he was adopted by the Levin family, is why I gave this book five stars. Oogy sounds like a truly inspirational dog, and I think that his story will hopefully inspire others to give a dog who is in need of someone to love them a chance to be loved and to give love in return. I also have to add that I wish more people wouldn't be afraid of pit bulls. I have a dog that has some pit bull in him, I am not sure how much, and he is as gentle as a teddy bear.

He rarely barks, never shows his teeth, in fact he is always looking for petting and loving. I am not saying that some dog breeds are not aggressive, but I believe that the owners of a dog contribute the most as to whether the dog is aggressive or just plain loving. I had to laugh at what all Oogy tore up in his puppy hood, I have to say my Great Dane Violet has more on him than that dog. She has chewed up doors, ate holes in walls, tore up furniture, and she too learned how to open the refrigerator and get whatever it is she wants to eat out of it.

Jun 07, Allison Mccandless rated it did not like it. I hated this book. There was no story, nothing interesting. Just a jumbled mess of fond memories of people telling this guy how special his dog is. The most interesting part of this book was the beginning when the author tells you what happened to Oogy and how they came to adopt him. But, that only took a few pages to tell. The rest is just painful to get through.

Oogy - the dog only a family could love - A book review

Let me save you a few hours of your life- Oogy was used as a bait dog in a dogfighting ring. Amazingly he survived the ordeal, the po I hated this book. Amazingly he survived the ordeal, the police brought him to the vet who saved his life. A good hearted family adopted him and forged a deep bond with him.

Then years of memories of how special Oogy is. Oogy stole my heart and made it ache to hug him. I felt like a part of this family thanks to the very descriptive writing of Mr. The story is an easy read, I finished it in one day, but a story that will stay with me forever. I can't imagine this book not having a positive affect on anyone who reads it! Oct 31, Dawn rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is a very touching book about a dog who survived horrific abuse. It is a story about a family who took this wonderful boy into their lives and the result was unconditional love!

Animal lovers will relate to this families journey with their boy through the ups and downs. Oogy is a special dog and deserved this family every bit as much as they deserved him. I cried throught this book and thanked God that these people took him in and gave Oogy the love he deserved.

Unfortunately, it also bring This is a very touching book about a dog who survived horrific abuse. Unfortunately, it also brings to light the evilness of dog fighting and makes you wonder how there can be such evil people who think that torture and pain of a living creature can be thought of as sport.

I truly hope that one day dog fighting will be a thing of the past. I think we need to push for more regulation and harsher penalties for the people who engage in this evil and horrific "sport". Oogy is truly a hero and shows how wonderful animals are that they can endure that and still be gentle and loving. I would be honored to kiss him on the head and tell him so! Please consider reading this wonderful book! Dec 07, Donna rated it really liked it Shelves: This story made my heart ache.

First I thought this was going to be cheesy and it seemed like the dog story was just a gimmick because the author starts off talking about his own life for some time. I kept thinking, "Where's the dog? I have admiration and respect for thos This guy, the one who took Oogy home, deserves the "Best Pet Owner in the World" award. I have admiration and respect for those who step up to the plate and make a difference, like this author and his family. I find these stories inspirational. Nov 30, Julianna rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Fans of Heartwarming Animal Stories.

Reviewed for THC Reviews Oogy is the inspirational, heartwarming story of a dog with an unbreakable spirit and will to live who never lost his loving, gentle demeanor in spite of unconscionable abuse. Before beginning the book, I had no idea why Oogy was disfigured, only that he was adorable anyway. Although the author, Oogy's master, Larry Levin, doesn't know all the details on how Oogy was rescued and brought to the animal hospital where they met, nor exactly what happened to him before that, I Reviewed for THC Reviews Oogy is the inspirational, heartwarming story of a dog with an unbreakable spirit and will to live who never lost his loving, gentle demeanor in spite of unconscionable abuse.

Although the author, Oogy's master, Larry Levin, doesn't know all the details on how Oogy was rescued and brought to the animal hospital where they met, nor exactly what happened to him before that, I think he's done a pretty good job of piecing together the information he did have to speculate, and the picture he has painted is positively horrifying. This poor puppy was used as bait for fighting dogs and left to die in a cage, but he was fortunately found by police who brought him to the only emergency animal hospital in the area. To think that anyone could do that to a poor, helpless animal is appalling.

No one really thought Oogy would survive, much less go on to lead a happy, productive life, but he defied the odds time and time again. If not for the kindhearted manager of the animal hospital, Oogy probably would have been put down, but she refused to give up on him and convinced the vet who was her business partner to try to save him.

We need more animal loving people like that in the world. I've tried to not think too harshly because after all Levin isn't an author. Oct 31, Dawn rated it it was amazing Shelves: I finished this last night and I hope I get to meet Oogy someday. If it were written from Oogy's perspective, I may have rated it higher. Some people might read this story and think how great it would be to go out and rescue a dog and live out the feel good aspects of this story themselves, so it is better that they have an idea of the time and commitment caring for special animals requires before rescuing.

They and other kind, loving people became instrumental in giving Oogy the life he deserved. I think it's a real testament to Oogy's personality and determination that he lived at all, much less was so sweet and docile throughout his surgeries and recovery. He obviously had an extraordinary tolerance for pain.

During his early years with the Levins, Oogy had a penchant for mischief and destruction, but his family exhibited the patience of Job with him, understandably not wanting to cause him any more fear after everything he'd been through already. Levin's words are any indication, I'd say that Oogy has brought the author and his family far more joy than heartache or frustration. Unforunately, poor Oogy had to go through several more surgeries. Some were for the purpose of reconstructing his damaged face, and all I can say is God bless Dr.

Bianco, the veterinarian who performed these surgeries and all other routine medical care for Oogy free of charge for his lifetime. There were other surgeries for torn ACLs that Dr. Bianco couldn't perform and for which the Levins had to pay large fees. They also had to patiently go through the rehabilitative process with him, and again, all I can say is God bless the Levins for their dedication and willingness to invest all their time and money to give this poor misfortunate dog a good life.

I think our pets often choose us, and that appears to be exactly what Oogy did. After reading the chapter 'Signs', it became even more apparent that Oogy was simply meant for the Levins. There is a chapter in the book about how Mr. Levin and his wife, Jennifer, came to adopt their twin sons, which I thought was very relevant. It shows what huge hearts these people have and how much family means to them. Oogy became a part of all that the minute he went home with them. The Levin house was brimming with love, kindness and patience which was exactly what Oogy needed.

Larry Levin's love for Oogy is very apparent, and he definitely thinks of Oogy as far more than just a dog. This animal has become a constant friend and companion. I don't think Oogy could have asked for a better family to spend his life with. In the last chapter, Mr. Levin mentioned trying to get Oogy certified to be a therapy dog, and I think he'd be great at it. I wish they had a website to keep readers updated, but I couldn't find any info as to whether Oogy successfully completed this training. It does appear though, that Mr. Levin and Oogy have made several appearances at fund-raising benefits and are helping to raise awareness of dog fighting which is an equally admirable mission.

Oogy is a gentle story about what it truly means to be a family, and other than some moderately disturbing details of Oogy's condition when he was rescued and what dog fighting is like, there is no objectionable content. It's a nice, easy read that would be appropriate for middle grades and up as long as they wouldn't be overly bothered by the things I mentioned. Oogy, both the book and the dog, are a real inspiration.

Levin says, if Oogy could survive all he went through with his sweet, gentle, loving disposition intact, so can others. This wonderful dog can be a great object lesson to educate and uplift all of us, but particularly those who may be suffering through a physical disfigurement or other obstacle of their own or who are trying to come to terms with abuse. This book warmed me through and through, and I highly recommend it to anyone who enjoys animal stories. Sep 25, Lori rated it really liked it.